High Blood Pressure Diet Advice

High Blood Pressure DietWhen it comes to regulating your hypertension, a high blood pressure diet will surely work wonders. A diet for high blood pressure is often devoid of any fatty, salty and sugary food. These are foods that can cause your blood pressure to spike. Replacing them with healthier alternatives is far more useful in lowering or at least regulating your blood pressure.

Start slowly

Before jumping into any hypertension diet, you need to make gradual changes first so as not to be overwhelmed.

A blood pressure diet often removes foods that you have grown accustomed to. If you remove too many of these foods at once, you will probably feel withdrawal symptoms. This could temp you to relapse and fall back to your usual diet that caused your high blood pressure in the first place. So make small changes to ensure you stick to the plan.

Know what you’re eating

Studies have shown that diet and high blood pressure are linked, since the foods you eat are broken down and absorbed by the body.

Imagine the amount of saturated fat you have been consuming for the past few weeks. Since this fat contains high amounts of cholesterol, imagine it sticking to your artery walls. This constricts blood flow, causing your blood pressure to sky rocket.

Now wouldn’t it be better to reduce your intake of these high calorie foods and simply change to diet to lower blood pressure? As a general rule, any fat that is solid at room temperature should be avoided.

Find healthy alternatives

In diets for high blood pressure, focus your meals on foods such as pasta, beans, and vegetables. You don’t have to become a vegetarian, but adding these to your daily diet can improve your blood pressure.

As for snacks, instead of loading on too many sweets, why not eat fruits instead? Forget about binging on cookies, chocolates, and other sweet snacks. Instead, make yourself a trail mix of pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, dried cranberries, Brazil nuts and other remedies for high blood pressure. It’s tasty, nutritious and it keeps you fuller for longer.

If you just have to have something sweet, opt for snacks that are sugar free. An even healthier option is to snack on a date or two. Gelatin is highly recommended as well. There are many other healthy snacks that you might want to include in your diet for hypertension.

Avoid temptation

Part of switching to a high blood pressure diet plan, is to remove any temptation in front of you. Rather focus on the right foods to lower blood pressure. Keep all treats and unhealthy foods out of sight. Or better yet – donate them to charity.

Spice it up

Instead of leaving the salt shaker on the table, be sure to store it away. And when you cook, instead of using salt, make use of herbs and spices instead. Removing salt from your food doesn’t mean that you have to eat boring, tasteless food. Just spice it up with a dash of organic herbs and spices. Fresh lemon juice makes a great flavor enhancer too.

Know what you’re buying

And if you are out shopping for foods, be sure to read the labels first. Some of the ingredients to look out for, and keep to a minimum are:

  • Saturated fats, Trans fats, hydrogenated fats, fats treated with antioxidants.
  • Sodium, monosodium glutamate (MSG), salt.
  • Sugar, sucrose, fructose, glucose, corn syrup, glycemic carbohydrates.

Bear in mind that processed foods are often high in fat and salt and will surely cause your blood pressure to go up when you consume too much.

These are some of the more important things you should be aware of when going on any high blood pressure diet. For a full list of foods and natural blood pressure remedies, you can find them in the high blood pressure report. Even if you don’t have hypertension yet, the advice will help you will live a healthier, longer life.


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1 comment

  1. Meenaloshani Saravanan

    My bp is 150/90 but I don’t have bp what do I do it goes up and down but now I am scared

    Reply

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